华夏配资网

Everything you need to know about the state flower

Welcome to the

华夏配资网-股票频道信息平台

A garden for everyone, open by reservation

Sunny Days Ahead

Get ready for Texas wildflower season

EVENTS & CLASSES

Join us for one of our exciting classes, programs or events

Sprouts image

Story Time

Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 – 10:30 a.m.

Tuesday Twilights feature

Tuesday Twilights

Tuesdays, March 22 – May 10, 2022

Thu 24

Series: Get FIT (SOLD OUT)

February 24 @ 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Thu 24

Story Time (CANCELLED)

February 24 @ 10:00 am - 10:30 am
Thu 24

Series: Get FIT

February 24 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Sat 26

Series: Let’s Care for Texas Plants!

February 26 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
Mon 28

Series: Yoga FIT

February 28 @ 11:00 am - 11:45 am

FIND A PLANT

Discover the Native Plants of North America


GARDEN VIEWS

An inside glimpse of the gardens from our Instagram feed

We asked you, our guests and members, to pick your favorite fort from our latest Fortlandia exhibition, and the results are in: 
 
The 2021-22 People's Choice Award goes to Critter Café, designed by Jodi Bade (@floopalina)! 
 
A quintessentially Austin fort, the Critter Café features a child-sized food truck and a small stage for tiny rock shows. Bonus: It’s built almost entirely from salvaged materials! 

Feeling inspired? We're looking for our next group of Fortlandia designers! Complete an interest form to let us know you'd like to receive a request for proposal (RFP) via link in bio.
Mandalas have long been used as meditation aids to help relish the present moment. Larissa van der Steen Quon creates hers out of fallen or intentionally harvested plant materials. 

"One of my favorite practices is taking meditative plant walks, soaking in the environment and elements with all of my senses, and creating a plant mandala and story around a moment in the wheel of the year,” she says. 

Larissa will be visiting the Wildflower Center monthly, using materials harvested from our gardens and trails to create mandalas that track the change of the seasons. The one pictured here is the first in this series. It features red yucca seed casings (Hesperaloe parviflora), yaupon leaves and berries (Ilex vomitoria), big muhly seed heads (Muhlenbergia lindheimeri) and other natural items found in our Savanah Meadow. Can you identify them all? 

📸 : Larissa van der Steen Quon (@wildalcove)
"Though dismissed as scraps, we must be clear: Black women have always been necessary to the fabric of our country. Their hands and bodies have helped sow the glorious patchwork that is horticulture in the United States."

- from “The Influencers” by Abra Lee (@conquerthesoil), which we’re revisiting in honor of Black History Month. Read the full Wildflower magazine article via link in bio. 

PHOTO: Catherine Waiters of Mars Bluff, South Carolina, sweeping her neighbor’s yard with a broom made of dogwood (Cornus sp.). Copyright © 1993 Amelia Wallace Vernon
“Will you accept this [rock] rose?” 

Rock roses (Pavonia lasiopetala) are technically roses in name alone and part of the mallow family, but they’d still look right at home on a Valentine’s Day card. Catch them in bloom April – Nov.

📸 Rock rose (Pavonia lasiopetala)
The Spanish name for leatherstem — sangre de drago — means “dragon’s blood.” Very fitting, considering the sap of this striking perennial begins clear but turns red with exposure to air. Doesn’t that sound like something out of a fantasy novel? Equally magical are the small white flowers leatherstem produces in the spring.

📸 Leatherstem (Jatropha dioica) by Ray Mathews
Big news! The Wildflower Center has appointed Dr. Sean Griffin its first Director of Science and Conservation. 

“I am excited to grow this new department,” said Griffin. “There are so many opportunities to connect with the public and learn how our research can support restoration efforts throughout Texas.” 

Learn more about Griffin and this exciting new era for the Wildflower Center via link in bio. 

📸 Dr. Griffin amid Lindheimer's senna (Senna lindheimeriana) by @sloanbreeden
This plant may be tricky to ID now, but come spring it will be a no-brainer. That’s right, these are bluebonnet (Lupinus texensis) rosettes: circular clusters of low-to-the-ground leaves that are fuzzy and palmately compound, usually with five leaflets. They’re adapted to withstand Texas cold spurts, like the one we recently experienced, and look extra pretty coated in frost. Blooms typically arrive toward the end of March and continue through late April. For more bluebonnet info, see link in bio.
The Center will be closed Thursday, Feb. 3 and Friday, Feb. 4 due to inclement weather. We hope you're staying safe and warm!
Hear ye! Hear ye! Allow us to present our 2022 Wildflower of the Year: the blanketflower. 

Firewheels and other blanketflowers (Gaillardia spp.) are generally easy to grow and beloved by bees and butterflies, making them a great option for both new and established gardeners — especially in Texas. Six species and 11 botanical varieties of the genus are native to the Lone Star State! 

Learn more about blanketflowers and why we love them via link in bio.

📸 Firewheel (Gaillardia pulchella) by @tdimenno
In 2021, we started a new tradition by declaring the sunflower our inaugural Wildflower of the Year. This year's honoree will be announced soon. Which native plant do you think it will be? Leave your guesses below!

📸 Maximilian sunflower (Helianthus maximiliani)
We asked you, our guests and members, to pick your favorite fort from our latest Fortlandia exhibition, and the results are in: 
 
The 2021-22 People's Choice Award goes to Critter Café, designed by Jodi Bade (@floopalina)! 
 
A quintessentially Austin fort, the Critter Café features a child-sized food truck and a small stage for tiny rock shows. Bonus: It’s built almost entirely from salvaged materials! 

Feeling inspired? We're looking for our next group of Fortlandia designers! Complete an interest form to let us know you'd like to receive a request for proposal (RFP) via link in bio.
Mandalas have long been used as meditation aids to help relish the present moment. Larissa van der Steen Quon creates hers out of fallen or intentionally harvested plant materials. 

"One of my favorite practices is taking meditative plant walks, soaking in the environment and elements with all of my senses, and creating a plant mandala and story around a moment in the wheel of the year,” she says. 

Larissa will be visiting the Wildflower Center monthly, using materials harvested from our gardens and trails to create mandalas that track the change of the seasons. The one pictured here is the first in this series. It features red yucca seed casings (Hesperaloe parviflora), yaupon leaves and berries (Ilex vomitoria), big muhly seed heads (Muhlenbergia lindheimeri) and other natural items found in our Savanah Meadow. Can you identify them all? 

📸 : Larissa van der Steen Quon (@wildalcove)
"Though dismissed as scraps, we must be clear: Black women have always been necessary to the fabric of our country. Their hands and bodies have helped sow the glorious patchwork that is horticulture in the United States."

- from “The Influencers” by Abra Lee (@conquerthesoil), which we’re revisiting in honor of Black History Month. Read the full Wildflower magazine article via link in bio. 

PHOTO: Catherine Waiters of Mars Bluff, South Carolina, sweeping her neighbor’s yard with a broom made of dogwood (Cornus sp.). Copyright © 1993 Amelia Wallace Vernon
“Will you accept this [rock] rose?” 

Rock roses (Pavonia lasiopetala) are technically roses in name alone and part of the mallow family, but they’d still look right at home on a Valentine’s Day card. Catch them in bloom April – Nov.

📸 Rock rose (Pavonia lasiopetala)
The Spanish name for leatherstem — sangre de drago — means “dragon’s blood.” Very fitting, considering the sap of this striking perennial begins clear but turns red with exposure to air. Doesn’t that sound like something out of a fantasy novel? Equally magical are the small white flowers leatherstem produces in the spring.

📸 Leatherstem (Jatropha dioica) by Ray Mathews
Big news! The Wildflower Center has appointed Dr. Sean Griffin its first Director of Science and Conservation. 

“I am excited to grow this new department,” said Griffin. “There are so many opportunities to connect with the public and learn how our research can support restoration efforts throughout Texas.” 

Learn more about Griffin and this exciting new era for the Wildflower Center via link in bio. 

📸 Dr. Griffin amid Lindheimer's senna (Senna lindheimeriana) by @sloanbreeden
This plant may be tricky to ID now, but come spring it will be a no-brainer. That’s right, these are bluebonnet (Lupinus texensis) rosettes: circular clusters of low-to-the-ground leaves that are fuzzy and palmately compound, usually with five leaflets. They’re adapted to withstand Texas cold spurts, like the one we recently experienced, and look extra pretty coated in frost. Blooms typically arrive toward the end of March and continue through late April. For more bluebonnet info, see link in bio.
The Center will be closed Thursday, Feb. 3 and Friday, Feb. 4 due to inclement weather. We hope you're staying safe and warm!
Hear ye! Hear ye! Allow us to present our 2022 Wildflower of the Year: the blanketflower. 

Firewheels and other blanketflowers (Gaillardia spp.) are generally easy to grow and beloved by bees and butterflies, making them a great option for both new and established gardeners — especially in Texas. Six species and 11 botanical varieties of the genus are native to the Lone Star State! 

Learn more about blanketflowers and why we love them via link in bio.

📸 Firewheel (Gaillardia pulchella) by @tdimenno
In 2021, we started a new tradition by declaring the sunflower our inaugural Wildflower of the Year. This year's honoree will be announced soon. Which native plant do you think it will be? Leave your guesses below!

📸 Maximilian sunflower (Helianthus maximiliani)

Help us spread the beauty!

EXPLORE MORE

Expert advice, plant nerdery and inspiring stories

Snow-on-the-prairie and a paper wasp; because it's a UVIVF image, the centers of the flowers stand out in blue against a plant that looks purple, and clumps of pollen shine bright white.

A Different Light

Creative photography helps us see flowers with new eyes

Illustration of compound leaves and round yellow flowers goldenball lead tree (Leucaena retusa)

Reflections and Reclamation

On Black Botanists Week and the power of representation
Big white bluestem prickly poppy blooms above purple blooms of prairie verbena along a concrete path.

Grounded

Time travel via tallgrass prairie